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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2017, Article ID 4856095, 12 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/4856095
Research Article

Antilipotoxicity Activity of Osmanthus fragrans and Chrysanthemum morifolium Flower Extracts in Hepatocytes and Renal Glomerular Mesangial Cells

1Department of Human Development and Family Studies, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei, Taiwan
2Department of Food Science, Nutrition and Nutraceutical Biotechnology, Shih Chien University, Taipei, Taiwan
3Department of Biotechnology and Pharmaceutical Technology, Yuanpei University of Medical Technology, Hsinchu, Taiwan

Correspondence should be addressed to Wen-Huey Wu; wt.ude.untn@50001t

Received 27 July 2017; Accepted 10 October 2017; Published 20 November 2017

Academic Editor: Sung-Ling Yeh

Copyright © 2017 Po-Jung Tsai et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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