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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2017, Article ID 5186904, 12 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/5186904
Review Article

The Role of Defensins in HIV Pathogenesis

1Division of Comparative Pathology, Tulane National Primate Research Center, Covington, LA, USA
2Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA, USA
3Department of Biological Sciences, California State University, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA

Correspondence should be addressed to Bapi Pahar; ude.enalut@rahapb

Received 14 March 2017; Accepted 24 July 2017; Published 3 August 2017

Academic Editor: Maria Rosaria Catania

Copyright © 2017 Barcley T. Pace et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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