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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 5217967, 14 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/5217967
Review Article

Advances of Stem Cell Therapeutics in Cutaneous Wound Healing and Regeneration

1Cardiovascular Stem Cell Research Laboratory, Wexner Medical Center, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA
2Vascular Biology and Stem Cell Research Laboratory, Department of Biomedical Sciences, School of Pharmacy, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Amarillo, TX 79106, USA

Correspondence should be addressed to Hiranmoy Das; ude.cshutt@sad.yomnarih

Received 13 May 2017; Revised 14 August 2017; Accepted 13 September 2017; Published 29 October 2017

Academic Editor: Juarez A. S. Quaresma

Copyright © 2017 Suman Kanji and Hiranmoy Das. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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