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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2017, Article ID 6752756, 11 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/6752756
Research Article

Increased Transendothelial Transport of CCL3 Is Insufficient to Drive Immune Cell Transmigration through the Blood–Brain Barrier under Inflammatory Conditions In Vitro

1Laboratory of Experimental Hematology, Vaccine & Infectious Disease Institute (VAXINFECTIO), Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Antwerp, 2610 Wilrijk, Belgium
2Laboratory of Cell Biology and Histology, Faculty of Pharmaceutical, Biomedical and Veterinary Sciences, University of Antwerp, 2610 Wilrijk, Belgium
3Center for Cell Therapy and Regenerative Medicine, Antwerp University Hospital, 2650 Edegem, Belgium

Correspondence should be addressed to Nathalie Cools; eb.azu@slooc.eilahtan

Received 10 November 2016; Revised 20 March 2017; Accepted 27 March 2017; Published 25 May 2017

Academic Editor: Karsten Ruscher

Copyright © 2017 Maxime De Laere et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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