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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2017, Article ID 6893560, 12 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/6893560
Research Article

AM966, an Antagonist of Lysophosphatidic Acid Receptor 1, Increases Lung Microvascular Endothelial Permeability through Activation of Rho Signaling Pathway and Phosphorylation of VE-Cadherin

1Acute Lung Injury Center of Excellence, Division of Pulmonary, Asthma, and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA
2Third Affiliated Hospital of Xiangya Medical School, Changsha, Hunan 410013, China
3Department of General Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Dalian Medical University, Dalian, Liaoning 116011, China

Correspondence should be addressed to Jing Zhao; ude.cmpu@joahz

Received 30 September 2016; Revised 4 January 2017; Accepted 15 January 2017; Published 27 February 2017

Academic Editor: Giuseppe Valacchi

Copyright © 2017 Junting Cai et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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