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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 7821672, 11 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/7821672
Review Article

What is “Hyper” in the ALS Hypermetabolism?

1Institute of Cell Biology and Neurobiology (IBCN), National Research Council (CNR), Via del Fosso di Fiorano 64, 00143 Rome, Italy
2IRCCS Santa Lucia Foundation, Via del Fosso di Fiorano 64, 00143 Rome, Italy

Correspondence should be addressed to Roberto Coccurello

Received 27 April 2017; Accepted 3 July 2017; Published 7 September 2017

Academic Editor: Thomas Möller

Copyright © 2017 Alberto Ferri and Roberto Coccurello. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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