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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 9624760, 11 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/9624760
Review Article

Macrophages as Key Drivers of Cancer Progression and Metastasis

Department of Molecular and Clinical Cancer Medicine, University of Liverpool, Ashton Street, Liverpool L69 3GE, UK

Correspondence should be addressed to Michael C. Schmid; ku.ca.looprevil@dimhcsm

Received 2 August 2016; Accepted 8 December 2016; Published 22 January 2017

Academic Editor: Sanja Štifter

Copyright © 2017 Sebastian R. Nielsen and Michael C. Schmid. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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