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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2018, Article ID 1924393, 9 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/1924393
Research Article

Salivary Gland Extract of Kissing Bug, Triatoma lecticularia, Reduces the Severity of Intestinal Inflammation through the Modulation of the Local IL-6/IL-10 Axis

1Instituto de Ciências Biológicas e Naturais, Universidade Federal do Triângulo Mineiro, Uberaba, MG, Brazil
2Instituto de Patologia Tropical e Saúde Pública, Universidade Federal de Goiás, Goiânia, GO, Brazil
3Departamento de Patologia Clínica, Universidade Federal do Triângulo Mineiro, Uberaba, MG, Brazil

Correspondence should be addressed to Helioswilton Sales-Campos; rb.psu.prfcf@selasnot

Received 6 March 2018; Accepted 3 July 2018; Published 22 July 2018

Academic Editor: Martha Lappas

Copyright © 2018 Helioswilton Sales-Campos et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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