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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2018 (2018), Article ID 2061376, 10 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/2061376
Research Article

Metabolic Derangements Contribute to Reduced sRAGE Isoforms in Subjects with Alzheimer’s Disease

1Department of Kinesiology and Nutrition, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA
2Department of Molecular & Integrative Physiology, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS, USA
3Department of Neurology, University of Kansas Medical Center, Fairway, KS, USA

Correspondence should be addressed to Jacob M. Haus; ude.ciu@jsuah

Received 15 November 2017; Accepted 9 January 2018; Published 22 February 2018

Academic Editor: Hermann Gram

Copyright © 2018 Kelly N. Z. Fuller et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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