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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2018, Article ID 2403935, 8 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/2403935
Review Article

Role of Interleukin- (IL-) 17 in the Pathogenesis and Targeted Therapies in Spondyloarthropathies

1Department of Internal Medicine, Cathay General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan
2Graduate Institute of Clinical Medicine, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan
3Department of Medicine, Division of Allergy, Immunology and Rheumatology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan, Taiwan
4College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan

Correspondence should be addressed to Ji-Yih Chen; wt.gro.hmgc@13nehcyj

Received 2 July 2017; Revised 18 December 2017; Accepted 31 December 2017; Published 12 February 2018

Academic Editor: Mirella Giovarelli

Copyright © 2018 I-Tsu Chyuan and Ji-Yih Chen. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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