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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2018, Article ID 2868702, 13 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/2868702
Research Article

Bisdemethoxycurcumin and Its Cyclized Pyrazole Analogue Differentially Disrupt Lipopolysaccharide Signalling in Human Monocyte-Derived Macrophages

1Venetian Institute of Molecular Medicine, Padua, Italy
2Department of Pharmaceutical and Pharmacological Sciences, University of Padua, Padua, Italy
3Department of Pharmacy and Biotechnology, Alma Mater Studiorum-University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy
4Department of Medicine, University of Padua, Padua, Italy

Correspondence should be addressed to Chiara Bolego; ti.dpinu@ogelob.araihc

Received 28 July 2017; Revised 31 October 2017; Accepted 29 November 2017; Published 8 February 2018

Academic Editor: Vinod K. Mishra

Copyright © 2018 Serena Tedesco et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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