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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2018 (2018), Article ID 3508506, 17 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/3508506
Research Article

Extraction Process, Component Analysis, and In Vitro Antioxidant, Antibacterial, and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Total Flavonoid Extracts from Abutilon theophrasti Medic. Leaves

Key Laboratory of Zoonosis of Liaoning Province, College of Animal Science and Veterinary Medicine, Shenyang Agricultural University, No. 120 Dongling Road, Shenhe District, Shenyang, Liaoning Province 110866, China

Correspondence should be addressed to Mingchun Liu; moc.anis@nuhcgnimuil

Received 7 November 2017; Revised 4 January 2018; Accepted 24 January 2018; Published 13 March 2018

Academic Editor: Adone Baroni

Copyright © 2018 Chunlian Tian et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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