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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2018, Article ID 4514329, 14 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/4514329
Research Article

The Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Shinbaro3 Is Mediated by Downregulation of the TLR4 Signalling Pathway in LPS-Stimulated RAW 264.7 Macrophages

1Jaseng Spine and Joint Research Institute, Jaseng Medical Foundation, Seoul 135-896, Republic of Korea
2College of Pharmacy, Natural Products Research Institute, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742, Republic of Korea

Correspondence should be addressed to Hwa-Jin Chung; ten.liamnah@kcuddab and In-Hyuk Ha; moc.liamg@atahinah

Received 26 October 2017; Revised 11 January 2018; Accepted 29 January 2018; Published 5 April 2018

Academic Editor: Yona Keisari

Copyright © 2018 Hwa-Jin Chung et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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