Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
Minimally Invasive Surgery
Volume 2010 (2010), Article ID 486174, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/486174
Research Article

The Relationship between Tests of Neurocognition and Performance on a Laparoscopic Simulator

1Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Maimonides Medical Center, 4802 Tenth avenue, Brooklyn, NY 11219, USA
2Department of Neurology, SUNY Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY 11203, USA

Received 4 March 2010; Accepted 17 May 2010

Academic Editor: Denis Querleu

Copyright © 2010 Oumar Kuzbari et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Objective. To estimate if there is a relationship between the results of tests of neurocognition and performance on a laparoscopic surgery simulator. Methods and Materials. Twenty participants with no prior laparoscopic experience had baseline cognitive tests administered (Trail Making Test, Part A and B (TMT-A and TMT-B), Grooved Peg Board Test, Symbol Digit Modalities Test, Symbol Digit Recall Test, and Stroop Interference Test), completed a demographic questionnaire, and then performed laparoscopy using a simulator. We correlated the results of cognitive tests with laparoscopic surgical performance. Results. One cognitive test sensitive to frontal lobe function, TMT-A, significantly correlated with laparoscopic surgical performance on the simulator (correlation coefficient of 0.534 with P<.05). However, the correlation between performance and other cognitive tests (TMT-B, Grooved Peg Board Test, Symbol Digit Modalities Test, Symbol Digit Recall Test, and Stroop Interference Test) was not statistically significant. Conclusion. Laparoscopic performance may be related to measures of frontal lobe function. Neurocognitive tests may predict motor skills abilities and performance on laparoscopic simulator.