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Minimally Invasive Surgery
Volume 2014, Article ID 451637, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/451637
Clinical Study

Complications of Minimally Invasive, Tubular Access Surgery for Cervical, Thoracic, and Lumbar Surgery

1Section of Neurological Surgery, Operative Care Division, Portland Veterans Administration Hospital, Portland, OR, USA
2Department of Neurological Surgery, Oregon Health & Science University, 3303 SW Bond Avenue, CH8N, Portland, OR 97239, USA

Received 19 February 2014; Accepted 23 June 2014; Published 7 July 2014

Academic Editor: Stephen Kavic

Copyright © 2014 Donald A. Ross. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

The object of the study was to review the author’s large series of minimally invasive spine surgeries for complication rates. The author reviewed a personal operative database for minimally access spine surgeries done through nonexpandable tubular retractors for extradural, nonfusion procedures. Consecutive cases ( ) were reviewed for complications. There were no wound infections. Durotomy occurred in 33 cases (2.7% overall or 3.4% of lumbar cases). There were no external or symptomatic internal cerebrospinal fluid leaks or pseudomeningoceles requiring additional treatment. The only motor injuries were 3 C5 root palsies, 2 of which resolved. Minimally invasive spine surgery performed through tubular retractors can result in a low wound infection rate when compared to open surgery. Durotomy is no more common than open procedures and does not often result in the need for secondary procedures. New neurologic deficits are uncommon, with most observed at the C5 root. Minimally invasive spine surgery, even without benefits such as less pain or shorter hospital stays, can result in considerably lower complication rates than open surgery.