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Mobile Information Systems
Volume 2016, Article ID 8352791, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/8352791
Research Article

Development of a Lunar-Phase Observation System Based on Augmented Reality and Mobile Learning Technologies

1Graduate Institute of Human Resource and e-Learning Technology, National Hsinchu University of Education, Hsinchu 30014, Taiwan
2Graduate Institute of Computer Science, National Hsinchu University of Education, Hsinchu 30014, Taiwan

Received 18 March 2016; Accepted 8 May 2016

Academic Editor: Miguel Torres-Ruiz

Copyright © 2016 Wernhuar Tarng et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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