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Mathematical Problems in Engineering
Volume 2013, Article ID 504183, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/504183
Research Article

Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Barnase: Contribution of Noncovalent Intramolecular Interaction to Thermostability

1Key Laboratory of Advanced Process Control for Light Industry-Ministry of Education, School of IoT Engineering, Jiangnan University, Wuxi 214122, China
2School of Information Science & Technology, East China Normal University, No. 500 Dong-Chuan Road, Shanghai 200241, China

Received 10 October 2013; Accepted 7 November 2013

Academic Editor: Shuping He

Copyright © 2013 Zhiguo Chen et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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