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Mathematical Problems in Engineering
Volume 2017, Article ID 7843465, 8 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/7843465
Research Article

Cost Sharing in the Prevention of Supply Chain Disruption

1Business School, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071, China
2College of Science, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072, China

Correspondence should be addressed to Xiaochen Sun; moc.361@227cxs

Received 5 February 2017; Revised 16 May 2017; Accepted 24 May 2017; Published 28 June 2017

Academic Editor: Mauro Gaggero

Copyright © 2017 Wen Wang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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