Mathematical Problems in Engineering

Mathematical Problems in Engineering / 2020 / Article

Research Article | Open Access

Volume 2020 |Article ID 7592302 | https://doi.org/10.1155/2020/7592302

Ola Ragb, Mohamed Salah, M. S. Matbuly, R. B. M. Amer, "Vibration Analysis of Piezoelectric Composite Plate Resting on Nonlinear Elastic Foundations Using Sinc and Discrete Singular Convolution Differential Quadrature Techniques", Mathematical Problems in Engineering, vol. 2020, Article ID 7592302, 22 pages, 2020. https://doi.org/10.1155/2020/7592302

Vibration Analysis of Piezoelectric Composite Plate Resting on Nonlinear Elastic Foundations Using Sinc and Discrete Singular Convolution Differential Quadrature Techniques

Academic Editor: Pietro Bia
Received10 Apr 2020
Accepted25 May 2020
Published15 Jul 2020

Abstract

In this work, free vibration of the piezoelectric composite plate resting on nonlinear elastic foundations is examined. The three-dimensionality of elasticity theory and piezoelectricity is used to derive the governing equation of motion. By implementing two differential quadrature schemes and applying different boundary conditions, the problem is converted to a nonlinear eigenvalue problem. The perturbation method and iterative quadrature formula are used to solve the obtained equation. Numerical analysis of the proposed schemes is introduced to demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of the obtained results. The obtained results are compared with available results in the literature, showing excellent agreement. Additionally, the proposed schemes have higher efficiency than previous schemes. Furthermore, a parametric study is introduced to investigate the effect of elastic foundation parameters, different materials of sensors and actuators, and elastic and geometric characteristics of the composite plate on the natural frequencies and mode shapes.

1. Introduction

The increase in the use of piezoelectric composite materials resting on elastic foundation structures, especially in aerospace, automotive, and marine environments, leads to the rise of difficulties in nonlinear vibrations in various modern engineering challenges. The elastic foundations play an important role that preserve the structural system under oscillations and avoid mechanical failures. The main role of nonlinear foundations is developing the accuracy of the model to describe the behavior of our system. The cubic nonlinearity is the most common type used in recent research [18].

Due to the mathematical complexity of such problems, only limited cases can analytically be solved. A number of exact methods of the vibration problems on elastic foundations are issued in [914]. Literature on the numerical solution of the research subject is sparse. Typical useful numerical methods, such as the finite element [1517], the boundary element [18], differential quadrature [19], and state space [20, 21] techniques, are used to solve such problems. One of the disadvantages of these methods is consuming too much time and effort to get the solution [2226]. Additionally, there is no research in piezoelectric composite plate resting on nonlinear elastic foundations, whether analytically or numerically.

The sinc differential quadrature method (SDQM) [2732] and the discrete singular convolution differential quadrature method (DSCDQM) [3342] are more reliable than the polynomial-based DQM. The nonlinear partial differential equations are reduced to linear equations using perturbation [43] and iterative quadrature methods [44]. Previous DQ techniques are then employed to reduce the problem to the eigenvalue or bending problem. The same schemes are used for free vibration analysis of piezoelectric nanobeams [45, 46]. Recent studies have investigated the vibration analysis of composite plate resting on elastic foundations, using DSCDQM [4758].

As far as the authors are aware, SDQM and DSCDQM have not been examined for vibration analysis of composite piezoelectric plate materials resting on nonlinear elastic foundations. Based on these versions, numerical schemes are designed for free vibration of piezoelectric composites. The natural frequencies are obtained and compared with previous analytical and numerical frequencies. For each scheme, the convergence and efficiency are verified. Additionally, a parametric study is introduced to investigate the influence of elastic foundation parameters and elastic and geometric characteristics of the composite on the vibrated results.

2. Formulation of the Problem

Consider a three-dimensional piezoelectric composite with , where a, b, and h are the length, width, and total thickness of the composite, respectively. This composite is polarized in the z direction and consists of m layers with different types of materials. The plate rests on a three-parameter foundation model, as shown in Figure 1.

Based on the theory of elasticity and piezoelectricity, the equations of motion and the charge equation of electrostatic can be written as follows [59, 6569]:where , , and are the stresses, displacement, and induction field in the x, y, and z directions, respectively; are the shear stresses; is the density of the material; and (k1, k2, k3) are linear Winkler foundation, linear Pasternak foundation, and nonlinear Winkler foundation parameters, respectively.

The relation between mechanical and electric material properties is constitutive equations, which can be written as follows:where C, e, and are the components of the effective elastic, piezoelectric, and dielectric constants of the same piezoelectric material, respectively, and is the electric potential.

For harmonic behavior, one can assume thatwhere ω is the natural frequency of the plate and . are the amplitudes for , and , respectively.

The elastic material constants can be determined as follows, using the reciprocal theorem [41]:where Ep, Gpq, and (p, q = 1, 2, 3) are Young’s moduli, shear moduli, and Poisson’s ratios.

The isotropic material constants can be expressed as follows [56]:

Substituting equations (5)–(16) into (1)–(4), the problem can be reduced to a quasistatic one, as follows:

The boundary conditions can be described as follows:(1)For a simply supported edge (S):(2)For a clamped edge (C):(3)For a free edge (F):

Mechanical and electrical boundary conditions at the lower and upper surfaces of the composite are as follows:

To ensure the continuity between electric and elastic layers, the following conditions can be considered:

Additionally, the continuity conditions between different elastic materials are as follows:

3. Method of Solution

Two differential quadrature techniques are employed to reduce the governing equations into a nonlinear eigenvalue problem, as follows.

3.1. Sinc Differential Quadrature Method (SDQM)

A cardinal sine function is used as a shape function, such that the unknown ψ and its derivatives can be approximated as a weighted linear sum of nodal values, ψi, (i= −N, N), as follows [2732]:where ψ denotes , and ; N is the number of grid points; and hx is the grid size. The weighting coefficients, and , can be determined by differentiating (28) as follows:

3.2. Discrete Singular Convolution Differential Quadrature Method (DSCDQM)

A singular convolution can be defined as follows [3342]:where is a singular kernel.

The DSC algorithm can be applied using many types of kernels. These kernels are applied as shape functions, such that the unknown ψ and its derivatives are approximated as a weighted linear sum of ψi, (i = −N, N) over a narrow bandwidth () [3337].

Two kernels of DSC will be employed as follows:(a)A Delta Lagrange kernel (DLK) can be used as a shape function, such that the unknown ψ and its derivatives can be approximated as a weighted linear sum of nodal values, ψi, (i= −N, N), as follows:where 2M + 1 is the effective computational bandwidth. are defined as follows:(b)A regularized Shannon kernel (RSK) can also be used as a shape function, such that the unknown ψ and its derivatives can be approximated as a weighted linear sum of nodal values, ψi, (i= −N, N), as follows:where σ is a regularization parameter and r is a computational parameter. The weighting coefficients and can be defined as follows [3342]:

Similarly, one can approximate , and calculate , . Two methods are used to transform the governing equation to linear equations.

3.2.1. Perturbation Method

Assuming the solution of equations (17)–(27) to be a power series that can be solved by a perturbation method of the second order [43] by substituting into (17)–(27) and equating the terms with the identical powers of , where is a perturbation parameter:

Equate the terms of in (39)–(42):

The previous system is an eigenvalue problem, which is solved to obtain the natural frequencies and the bending deflection W0.

Equate the terms of in (39)–(42):

The previous system is a bending problem, which is solved to obtain W1.

Equate the terms of in (39)–(42):

The previous system is a bending problem, which is solved to obtain W2.

Finally, the series solution can be written as follows:

The convergence condition [43] due to the perturbation method is set as follows:

3.2.2. Iterative Quadrature

We solved the following iterative system:

To get , we solved the following eigenvalue problem:

The boundary conditions (21)–(27) can also be approximated using two DQMs as follows:(1)Simply supported (S):(2)Clamped (C):(3)Free surface (F):

Mechanical and electrical boundary conditions at the lower and upper surfaces of the composite are as follows:

The continuity conditions between the interfaces of layers can be assumed as follows:

We have solved the generalized eigenvalue problem [65]:where K is the coefficient matrix of the previous system, M is the mass matrix and can be diagonal with 0 diagonal elements, and is the free vibration frequencies squared.

For nontrivial solutions for (70), the following determinant should be 0:

Equation (71) gives the natural frequencies for the composite plate.

4. Numerical Results

The present numerical results demonstrate the convergence and efficiency of each one of the proposed schemes for vibration analysis of the piezoelectric composite plate Al/Al2O3 resting on a nonlinear elastic foundation. For all results, the boundary conditions (65)–(69) are augmented in the governing equations (39)–(42).

For practical purposes, the field quantities are normalized as follows:where are the normalized amplitudes of displacements, are the normalized amplitudes of stresses, are the normalized amplitudes of shear stresses, are the thicknesses of the actuator and sensor, and are the flexural rigidity for the bottom layer of composite and the equivalent dimensionless elastic foundation constants.

The computational characteristics of each scheme are adapted to reach accurate results with error of order ≤10−8. The obtained dimensionless frequencies , , and are evaluated as follows: , where and are the density and Young’s modulus, respectively.

For the present results, material parameters for the composite are listed in Table 1.


Material propertyYoung’s moduli (GPa)Shear moduli (GPa)Poisson’s ratiosDensity (kg/m3)
E2E1E3G12G13G23
725E2E20.5E2G120.2E20.250.030.41600

Metal (aluminum, Al)700.32702
Ceramic (alumina, Al2O3)3800.33800

Effective elastic (GPa)
C11C12C13C22C23C33C44C55C66

Sensor PZT-413978741397411525.625.630.5
Sensor BaTiO3166777816678162434344.5
Actuator Ba2NaNb5O15239104524752135656676
Actuator PZT-5A121777712111121212123

Material propertyPiezoelectric constants (C/m2)Dielectric constants (F/m) ∗ 10−9Density (kg/m3)
e1e2e3e4e5

Sensor PZT-4−5.2−5.215.112.712.76.56.55.67500
Sensor BaTiO3−4.4−4.418.611.611.611.211.212.65700
Actuator Ba2NaNb5O15−0.4−0.34.33.42.819.62.010.285300
Actuator PZT-5A−5.4−5.415.83.43.48.118.117.342330

For the sinc DQ scheme, the problem is solved over a regular grid, ranging from 3 × 5 × 5 to 11 × 5 × 5. Table 2 shows the convergence of the obtained results for the isotropic plate, which is in agreement with the exact results in [68] over grid size ≥7 × 5 × 5.


ResultsNormalized frequencies
N

Sinc DQM355.9218103.4553124.1464161.3903177.5293186.4058
555.9721103.5484124.2581161.5355177.6891186.5736
756.0369103.6682124.2982161.5391177.6930186.5777
956.0369103.6683124.2982161.5391177.6930186.5777
1156.0369103.6683124.2982161.5391177.6930186.5777
Analytical [68]56.0359
RHSDT [69]56.0310
NSDT [60]56.0311
Execution time (sec)5.615225 over N = 7 × 5 × 5

RHSDT: refined hyperbolic shear deformation theory; NSDT: new shear deformation theory; DQM: differential quadrature method.

For DSCDQ scheme based on Delta Lagrange kernel, the problem is also solved over a uniform grid ranging from 3 × 5 × 5 to 11 × 5 × 5. The bandwidth 2M + 1 ranges from 3 to 11.

Table 3 shows the convergence of the obtained fundamental frequency, which is in agreement with the exact results in [68] over grid size ≥7 × 5 × 5 and bandwidth ≥5. Table 4 shows that the obtained results are more accurate than those obtained using approximated theories [60, 69]. This table also shows that the execution time of DSCDQM-DLK was less than that of sinc DQM.


Fundamental frequencyDSCDQM-DLK
BandwidthN357911

2M + 1 = 355.984456.084956.068556.068556.0685
2M + 1 = 555.952456.034956.032056.032056.0320
2M + 1 = 756.179856.065056.032056.032056.0320
2M + 1 = 955.938456.287756.032056.032056.0320
2M + 1 = 1155.938456.287756.032056.032056.0320


Normalized frequencies
ResultsN

DSCDQM-DLK355.9524103.5119124.2142161.4660177.6126186.4932
556.0349103.6085124.3302161.5049177.6553186.5380
756.0320103.6031124.3237161.4964177.6444186.5266
956.0320103.6031124.3237161.4964177.6444186.5266
Analytical [68]56.0359
RHSDT [69]56.0310
NSDT [60]56.0311
Execution time (sec)5.611001 over N = 7 × 5 × 5

For the DSCDQ scheme based on the regularized Shannon kernel (RSK), the problem was also solved over a uniform grid ranging from 3 × 5 × 5 to 9 × 5 × 5. The bandwidth 2M + 1 ranged from 3 to 11 and the regularization parameter σ = r hx ranged from 1.0 hx to 2.3 hx, where hx = 1/N − 1. Table 5 shows the convergence of the obtained fundamental frequency to the exact results in [68] over grid size ≥5 × 5 × 5, bandwidth ≥3, and regularization parameter σ = 1.9 hx.


Fundamental frequencyRegularization parameterDSCDQM-RSK
N2M + 1σ = 1 × hxσ = 1.5 × hxσ = 1.9 × hxσ = 2.3 × hx

3355.956455.946855.985356.0821
555.956155.899155.978056.0706
755.956155.899155.978056.0706

5355.875855.971556.031856.0318
555.875855.971556.031856.0318
755.875855.971556.031856.0318

7355.850755.939256.031856.0318
555.956355.979056.031856.0318
755.992655.991756.031856.0318

9355.925955.985756.031856.0318
555.982355.973356.031856.0318
755.950656.019356.031856.0318