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Multiple Sclerosis International
Volume 2013, Article ID 151427, 16 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/151427
Review Article

Autoimmune T-Cell Reactivity to Myelin Proteolipids and Glycolipids in Multiple Sclerosis

UQ Centre for Clinical Research, Royal Brisbane & Women’s Hospital, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4029, Australia

Received 28 June 2013; Accepted 12 September 2013

Academic Editor: Bianca Weinstock-Guttman

Copyright © 2013 Judith M. Greer. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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