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Multiple Sclerosis International
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 859323, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/859323
Research Article

Effects of Walking Direction and Cognitive Challenges on Gait in Persons with Multiple Sclerosis

1Department of Kinesiology and Community Health, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 301 Freer Hall, 906 South Goodwin Avenue, Urbana, IL 61801, USA
2University of Illinois College of Medicine at Peoria, 1 Illini Dr. Peoria, IL 61605, USA

Received 28 June 2013; Accepted 11 September 2013

Academic Editor: Francesca Bagnato

Copyright © 2013 Douglas A. Wajda et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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