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Multiple Sclerosis International
Volume 2015, Article ID 681289, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/681289
Review Article

The Therapeutic Potential of the Ketogenic Diet in Treating Progressive Multiple Sclerosis

Department of Neuro-Ophthalmology, The National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, Box 93, Queen Square, London WC1N 3BG, UK

Received 22 September 2015; Accepted 2 December 2015

Academic Editor: Francesco Patti

Copyright © 2015 Mithu Storoni and Gordon T. Plant. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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