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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2007 (2007), Article ID 26496, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2007/26496
Research Article

Chronic Fluoxetine Treatment Induces Brain Region-Specific Upregulation of Genes Associated with BDNF-Induced Long-Term Potentiation

Department of Biomedicine and Bergen Mental Health Research Center, University of Bergen, Jonas Lies vei 91, Bergen 5009, Norway

Received 23 March 2007; Accepted 27 July 2007

Academic Editor: Monica Di Luca

Copyright © 2007 Maria Nordheim Alme et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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