Neural Plasticity
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Acceptance rate43%
Submission to final decision66 days
Acceptance to publication43 days
CiteScore3.330
Impact Factor3.591
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The Long-Term Effects of Acupuncture on Hippocampal Functional Connectivity in aMCI with Hippocampal Atrophy: A Randomized Longitudinal fMRI Study

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 Journal profile

Neural Plasticity is an interdisciplinary journal dedicated to the publication of articles related to all aspects of neural plasticity, with special emphasis on its functional significance as reflected in behavior and in psychopathology.

 Editor spotlight

Chief Editor, Professor Baudry, is currently University Professor at Western University of Health Sciences in Pomona, CA. His research focuses on understanding the molecular/cellular mechanisms of learning and memory and neurodegeneration.

 Special Issues

We currently have a number of Special Issues open for submission. Special Issues highlight emerging areas of research within a field, or provide a venue for a deeper investigation into an existing research area.

Latest Articles

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Review Article

Role of Astrocytic Dysfunction in the Pathogenesis of Parkinson’s Disease Animal Models from a Molecular Signaling Perspective

Despite the fact that astrocytes are the most abundant glial cells, critical for brain function, few studies have dealt with their possible role in neurodegenerative diseases like Parkinson’s disease (PD). This article explores relevant evidence on the involvement of astrocytes in experimental PD neurodegeneration from a molecular signaling perspective. For a long time, astrocytic proliferation was merely considered a byproduct of neuroinflammation, but by the time being, it is clear that astrocytic dysfunction plays a far more important role in PD pathophysiology. Indeed, ongoing experimental evidence suggests the importance of astrocytes and dopaminergic neurons’ cross-linking signaling pathways. The Wnt-1 (wingless-type MMTV integration site family, member 1) pathway regulates several processes including neuron survival, synapse plasticity, and neurogenesis. In PD animal models, Frizzled (Fzd) neuronal receptors’ activation by the Wnt-1 normally released by astrocytes following injuries leads to β-catenin-dependent gene expression, favoring neuron survival and viability. The transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) capsaicin receptor also participates in experimental PD genesis. Activation of astrocyte TRPV1 receptors by noxious stimuli results in reduced inflammatory response and increased ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) synthesis, which enhances neuronal survival and differentiation. Another major pathway involves IκB kinase (IKK) downregulation by ARL6ip5 (ADP-ribosylation-like factor 6 interacting protein 5, encoded by the cell differentiation-associated, JWA, gene). Typically, IKK releases the proinflammatory NF-κB (nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells) molecule from its inhibitor. Therefore, by downregulating NF-κB inhibitor, ARL6ip5 promotes an anti-inflammatory response. The evidence provided by neurotoxin-induced PD animal models guarantees further research on the neuroprotective potential of normalizing astrocyte function in PD.

Clinical Study

Cancer-Related Anemia Is a Risk Factor for Medium-Term Postoperative Cognitive Dysfunction in Laparoscopic Surgery Patients: An Observational Prospective Study

Anemia in the elderly may impair cognitive function. Our primary objective was to determine whether cancer-related anemia was associated with postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) in nonelderly patients. We conducted an observational prospective study of 177 patients scheduled for laparoscopic surgery. Patients aged 18-64 were divided into two groups according to whether they were anemic due to cancer or not. The cognitive function was assessed by the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) 1 day before and 1 week after operation. The cognitive function of the patients was evaluated by using the Telephone Interview for Cognitive Status-Modified (TICS-M) 3 months after operation. The quality of life of patients was evaluated after operation. The hemoglobin level and other clinical data were recorded before operation. Of the 170 patients, 100 without anemia and 70 anemia patients had been evaluated 1 week after operation. POCD was detected in 43 cases (25.3% of 170 cases) at 1 week and 30 cases (19% of 158 cases) at 3 months postoperatively. Anemia was an independent risk factor for 3-month POCD occurrence (). The education level of the patients who had POCD at 1 week and 3 months after operation was lower (, , respectively). Age was independently associated with the incidence of POCD at 3 months (). In general, these findings suggested that anemia may increase the incidence of medium-term POCD in cancer patients undergoing laparoscopic surgery.

Research Article

Acupuncture Induces Reduction in Limbic-Cortical Feedback of a Neuralgia Rat Model: A Dynamic Causal Modeling Study

Background. Neuropathic pain after brachial plexus avulsion remained prevalent and intractable currently. However, the neuroimaging study about neural mechanisms or etiology was limited and blurred. Objective. This study is aimed at investigating the effect of electroacupuncture on effective connectivity and neural response in corticolimbic circuitries during implicit processing of nociceptive stimulus in rats with brachial plexus pain. Methods. An fMRI scan was performed in a total of 16 rats with brachial plexus pain, which was equally distributed into the model group and the electroacupuncture group. The analysis of task-dependent data determined pain-related activation in each group. Based on those results, several regions including AMY, S1, and h were recruited as ROI in dynamic causal modeling (DCM) analysis comparing evidence for different neuronal hypotheses describing the propagation of noxious stimuli in regions of interest and horizontal comparison of effective connections between the model and electroacupuncture groups. Results. In both groups, DCM revealed that noxious stimuli were most likely driven by the somatosensory cortex, with bidirectional propagation with the hypothalamus and amygdala and the interactions in them. Also, the 3-month intervention of acupuncture reduced effective connections of h-S1 and AMY-S1. Conclusions. We showed an evidence that a full connection model within the brain network of brachial plexus pain and electroacupuncture intervention reduces effective connectivity from h and AMY to S1. Our study for the first time explored the relationship of involved brain regions with dynamic causal modeling. It provided novel evidence for the feature of the organization of the cortical-limbic network and the alteration caused by acupuncture.

Research Article

Exercise-Induced Adaptations to the Mouse Striatal Adenosine System

Adenosine acts as a key regulator of striatum activity, in part, through the antagonistic modulation of dopamine activity. Exercise can increase adenosine activity in the brain, which may impair dopaminergic functions in the striatum. Therefore, long-term repeated bouts of exercise may subsequently generate plasticity in striatal adenosine systems in a manner that promotes dopaminergic activity. This study investigated the effects of long-term voluntary wheel running on adenosine 1 (A1R), adenosine 2A (A2AR), dopamine 1 (D1R), and dopamine 2 (D2R) receptor protein expression in adult mouse dorsal and ventral striatum structures using immunohistochemistry. In addition, equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 (ENT1) protein expression was examined after wheel running, as ENT1 regulates the bidirectional flux of adenosine between intra- and extracellular space. The results suggest that eight weeks of running wheel access spared age-related increases of A1R and A2AR protein concentrations across the dorsal and ventral striatal structures. Wheel running mildly reduced ENT1 protein levels in ventral striatum subregions. Moreover, wheel running mildly increased D2R protein density within striatal subregions in the dorsal medial striatum, nucleus accumbens core, and the nucleus accumbens shell. However, D1R protein expression in the striatum was unchanged by wheel running. These data suggest that exercise promotes adaptations to striatal adenosine systems. Exercise-reduced A1R and A2AR and exercise-increased D2R protein levels may contribute to improved dopaminergic signaling in the striatum. These findings may have implications for cognitive and behavioral processes, as well as motor and psychiatric diseases that involve the striatum.

Review Article

Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor and Its Potential Therapeutic Role in Stroke Comorbidities

With the rise in the aging global population, stroke comorbidities have become a serious health threat and a tremendous economic burden on human society. Current therapeutic strategies mainly focus on protecting neurons from cytotoxic damage at the acute phase upon stroke onset, which not only is a difficult way to ameliorate stroke symptoms but also presents a challenge for the patients to receive effective treatment in time. The brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is the most abundant neurotrophin in the adult brain, which possesses a remarkable capability to repair brain damage. Recent promising preclinical outcomes have made BDNF a popular late-stage target in the development of novel stroke treatments. In this review, we aim to summarize the latest progress in the understanding of the cellular/molecular mechanisms underlying stroke pathogenesis, current strategies and difficulties in drug development, the mechanism of BDNF action in poststroke neurorehabilitation and neuroplasticity, and recent updates in novel therapeutic methods.

Research Article

Among Adolescents, BDNF and Pro-BDNF Lasting Changes with Alcohol Use Are Stage Specific

Adolescent alcohol use demonstrates distinct developmental trajectories with dissimilar times of onset and trajectories. Given the importance of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (mature BDNF) in this development stage, the current study investigated its relationship with alcohol use. It also extends the literature by assessing the role of its precursor (pro-BDNF). Therefore, over the span of 5 years, we enrolled and followed participants to define age-related changes in BDNF levels in healthy adolescents. Then, the onset and frequency of alcohol use from ages 11 to 18 were collected to determine how the relationship between alcohol, pro-BDNF, and m-BDNF unfolds over time. With respect to development, analyses demonstrated that BDNF concentration slowly increases throughout adolescence. However, despite having similar basal BDNF levels, compared to controls, adolescents that started drinking before 15 years of age always exhibited lower BDNF levels. They also had a significant decrease in pro-BDNF levels. On the other hand, levels of mature BDNF steadily increased () in those starting alcohol use after the age of 15. Similar to the younger users, a significant drop in pro-BDNF levels was observed over the course of the study. Our results suggested that both pathways may participate in the complex processes of alcohol dependence. The findings highlight the relevance of assessing alcohol-associated changes across the different phases of this vulnerable developmental period. This is the first study evidencing that m-BDNF changes associated with drinking behaviors differed between young and older adolescents. It is also the first article, documenting that drinking during adolescence leads to long-term decreases in pro-BDNF. These results have important implications for policies and programs targeting alcohol use disorders.

Neural Plasticity
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate43%
Submission to final decision66 days
Acceptance to publication43 days
CiteScore3.330
Impact Factor3.591
 Submit