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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2007 (2007), Article ID 78970, 20 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2007/78970
Review Article

Stress and Memory: Behavioral Effects and Neurobiological Mechanisms

1Brain Mind Institute, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Lausanne 1015, Switzerland
2Departamento de Psicobiología, Universidad Nacional de Educación a Distancia, Juan del Rosal s/n, Madrid 28040, Spain
3Departamento de Psicología, Universidad Iberoamericana, Prolongación Paseo de la Reforma 880, Santa Fe, México 01219, Mexico

Received 21 December 2006; Accepted 14 February 2007

Academic Editor: Georges Chapouthier

Copyright © 2007 Carmen Sandi and M. Teresa Pinelo-Nava. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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