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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2007, Article ID 90472, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2007/90472
Research Article

Autobiographical Memory Retrieval and Hippocampal Activation as a Function of Repetition and the Passage of Time

Department of Psychology, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA

Received 17 April 2007; Revised 4 September 2007; Accepted 8 October 2007

Academic Editor: Leonardo G. Cohen

Copyright © 2007 Lynn Nadel et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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