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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2008, Article ID 381243, 18 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2008/381243
Review Article

What Does the Anatomical Organization of the Entorhinal Cortex Tell Us?

1Department of Neuroscience, Kavli Institute for Systems Neuroscience and Centre for the Biology of Memory, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Building MTFS, 7489 Trondheim, Norway
2Department of Anatomy and Neurosciences, Institute for Clinical and Experimental Neurosciences, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, P.O. Box 7057, 1007MB Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Received 6 February 2008; Accepted 23 May 2008

Academic Editor: Roland S. G. Jones

Copyright © 2008 Cathrin B. Canto et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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