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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2009 (2009), Article ID 108135, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2009/108135
Review Article

Panic Disorder: Is the PAG Involved?

Psychiatry Division, Faculty of Medicine of Ribeirão Preto, University of São Paulo, Avenida Bandeirantes, 3900, 14048-900 Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brazil

Received 28 May 2008; Revised 25 September 2008; Accepted 17 December 2008

Academic Editor: Robert Adamec

Copyright © 2009 Cristina Marta Del-Ben and Frederico Guilherme Graeff. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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