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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2011, Article ID 286073, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/286073
Review Article

Brain Plasticity and Disease: A Matter of Inhibition

1National Research Council (CNR), Neuroscience Institute, Via Moruzzi 1, I-56124 Pisa, Italy
2Department of Psychology, Florence University, Pizza San Marco 4, I-50121 Florence, Italy
3Laboratory of Neurobiology, Scuola Normale Superiore, Pizza Cavalieri 7, I-56126 Pisa, Italy

Received 10 January 2011; Accepted 4 May 2011

Academic Editor: Graziella Di Cristo

Copyright © 2011 Laura Baroncelli et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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