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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2011, Article ID 579840, 21 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/579840
Review Article

A Neural Correlate of Predicted and Actual Reward-Value Information in Monkey Pedunculopontine Tegmental and Dorsal Raphe Nucleus during Saccade Tasks

1Graduate School of Frontier Biosciences, Osaka University, 1-3 Machikaneyama, Toyonaka 560-8531, Japan
2Department of Physiology, Kansai Medical University, 10-15 Fumizono-cho, Moriguchi City, Osaka 570-8506, Japan
3ATR Computational Neuroscience Laboratories, 2-2-2 Hikaridai, Seika-cho, Kyoto 619-0288, Japan
4PRESTO, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), 4-1-8 Honcho Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012, Japan

Received 13 March 2011; Revised 13 July 2011; Accepted 4 August 2011

Academic Editor: Johannes J. Letzkus

Copyright © 2011 Ken-ichi Okada et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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