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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2011, Article ID 614329, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/614329
Review Article

Functional Consequences of the Disturbances in the GABA-Mediated Inhibition Induced by Injuriesin the Cerebral Cortex

Institute of Physiology and Pathophysiology, Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University, Duesbergweg 6, 55128 Mainz, Germany

Received 22 January 2011; Accepted 5 April 2011

Academic Editor: Graziella Di Cristo

Copyright © 2011 Barbara Imbrosci and Thomas Mittmann. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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