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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2012, Article ID 670821, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/670821
Review Article

Synaptic Functions of Invertebrate Varicosities: What Molecular Mechanisms Lie Beneath

1Department of Neuroscience, University of Torino, Corso Raffaello 30, 10125 Torino, Italy
2Istituto Nazionale di Neuroscienze, Corso Raffaello 30, 10125 Torino, Italy

Received 30 November 2011; Accepted 27 February 2012

Academic Editor: Volker Korz

Copyright © 2012 Carlo Natale Giuseppe Giachello et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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