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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 627325, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/627325
Review Article

Microglia: An Active Player in the Regulation of Synaptic Activity

Department of Pharmacological Sciences, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-8651, USA

Received 26 May 2013; Revised 5 September 2013; Accepted 19 September 2013

Academic Editor: Brian MacVicar

Copyright © 2013 Kyungmin Ji et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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