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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2013, Article ID 654257, 19 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/654257
Review Article

Ionotropic Glutamate Receptors and Voltage-Gated Ca2+ Channels in Long-Term Potentiation of Spinal Dorsal Horn Synapses and Pain Hypersensitivity

1Department of Oral Physiology, School of Dentistry, Kyungpook National University, 188-1 Samduck-2, Chung-gu, Daegu 700-412, Republic of Korea
2Department of Anatomy, Histology and Embryology, Semmelweis University, Tüzoltó Utca 58, Budapest, Hungary
3Department of Pharmacology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Mail Stop 8315, 12800 E. 19th Avenue, P18-7104, Aurora, CO 80045, USA

Received 11 July 2013; Revised 27 August 2013; Accepted 27 August 2013

Academic Editor: Clive Bramham

Copyright © 2013 Dong-ho Youn et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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