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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 954302, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/954302
Research Article

Presynaptic Glycine Receptors Increase GABAergic Neurotransmission in Rat Periaqueductal Gray Neurons

Department of Pharmacology, School of Dentistry, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 700-412, Republic of Korea

Received 24 May 2013; Revised 6 July 2013; Accepted 31 July 2013

Academic Editor: Dong-ho Youn

Copyright © 2013 Kwi-Hyung Choi et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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