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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2014, Article ID 127824, 16 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/127824
Research Article

Modulation of Electrocortical Brain Activity by Attention in Individuals with and without Tinnitus

1Department of Psychology, Neuroscience & Behaviour, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, ON, Canada L8S 4K1
2Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, ON, Canada L8S 4K1
3McMaster Institute for Music and the Mind, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, ON, Canada L8S 4K1

Received 27 March 2014; Accepted 15 April 2014; Published 12 June 2014

Academic Editor: Aage Møller

Copyright © 2014 Brandon T. Paul et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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