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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2014, Article ID 180138, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/180138
Research Article

Long-Term Effects of Musical Training and Functional Plasticity in Salience System

1Key Laboratory for NeuroInformation of Ministry of Education, School of Life Science and Technology, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu, China
2Medical Engineering Department, PLA Chengdu Military Area Command General Hospital, Chengdu, China
3Key Laboratory of Cognition and Personality of Ministry of Education, Southwest University, Chongqing, China

Received 15 August 2014; Revised 21 October 2014; Accepted 21 October 2014; Published 13 November 2014

Academic Editor: Małgorzata Kossut

Copyright © 2014 Cheng Luo et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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