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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2014, Article ID 310146, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/310146
Research Article

Downregulated GABA and BDNF-TrkB Pathway in Chronic Cyclothiazide Seizure Model

1Institutes of Brain Science and State Key Laboratory of Medical Neurobiology, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032, China
2Chongqing Key Laboratory of Catalysis and Functional Organic Molecules and Chongqing Key Laboratory of Nature Medicine Research, Chongqing Technology and Business University, Chongqing 400067, China
3Department of Neurosurgery, Shanghai Ninth People’s Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200011, China

Received 12 December 2013; Accepted 28 January 2014; Published 13 March 2014

Academic Editor: Sheng Tian Li

Copyright © 2014 Shuzhen Kong et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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