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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 584314, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/584314
Research Article

Abeta(1-42) Enhances Neuronal Excitability in the CA1 via NR2B Subunit-Containing NMDA Receptors

1Department of Medical Chemistry, University of Szeged, Szeged 6726, Hungary
2Biological Research Center—Biochemistry, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Temesvari Körút 32, Szeged 6726, Hungary

Received 13 June 2014; Revised 5 August 2014; Accepted 17 August 2014; Published 3 September 2014

Academic Editor: Lucas Pozzo-Miller

Copyright © 2014 Edina Varga et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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