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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2015, Article ID 172192, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/172192
Research Article

Neuroplastic Effects of Combined Computerized Physical and Cognitive Training in Elderly Individuals at Risk for Dementia: An eLORETA Controlled Study on Resting States

1Lab of Medical Physics, Medical School, Faculty of Health Sciences, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, P.O. Box 376, 54124 Thessaloniki, Greece
2Laboratory for Human Brain Dynamics, AAI Scientific Cultural Services Ltd., Office 501, Galaxias Building Block A, 33 Arch. Makarios III Avenue, 1065 Nicosia, Cyprus

Received 15 December 2014; Revised 9 March 2015; Accepted 16 March 2015

Academic Editor: Michel Baudry

Copyright © 2015 Charis Styliadis et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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