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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 197392, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/197392
Research Article

Inhibition of Hyperpolarization-Activated Cation Current in Medium-Sized DRG Neurons Contributed to the Antiallodynic Effect of Methylcobalamin in the Rat of a Chronic Compression of the DRG

1Institute of Neurosciences, the Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an 710032, China
2State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology and Institute of Digestive Diseases, Department of Digestive Surgery, Xijing Hospital, the Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an 710032, China

Received 23 January 2015; Revised 23 March 2015; Accepted 23 March 2015

Academic Editor: Gianluca Coppola

Copyright © 2015 Ming Zhang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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