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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2015, Article ID 291476, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/291476
Review Article

Neurodevelopmental Plasticity in Pre- and Postnatal Environmental Interactions: Implications for Psychiatric Disorders from an Evolutionary Perspective

1Department of Food Science & Nutrition, Catholic University of Daegu, Gyeongsan-si, Gyeongbuk 712-702, Republic of Korea
2Primate Research Institute, Kyoto University, Inuyama, Aichi 484-8506, Japan

Received 23 December 2014; Revised 29 March 2015; Accepted 15 April 2015

Academic Editor: Long-Jun Wu

Copyright © 2015 Young-A Lee et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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