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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2015, Article ID 410785, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/410785
Research Article

The Role of the Right Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex in Phasic Alertness: Evidence from a Contingent Negative Variation and Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Study

1Department of Neurology and Psychiatry, Sapienza University of Rome, Viale dell’Università 30, 00185 Rome, Italy
2Department of Neuroscience, AOU Careggi, Largo Brambilla 3, 50134 Florence, Italy
3IRCCS Fondazione Don Carlo Gnocchi, Via di Scandicci 265, 50143 Florence, Italy
4Department of Medical-Surgical Sciences and Biotechnologies, A. Fiorini Hospital, Sapienza University of Rome, Polo Pontino, Via Firenze, 04019 Terracina, Italy
5Department of Neurology and Psychiatry, Neurosurgery, Sapienza University of Rome, Viale del Policlinico, 00185 Rome, Italy
6Neurology and Neurophysiopathology Unit, Sandro Pertini Hospital, Via Monti Tiburtini 385, 00157 Rome, Italy

Received 1 March 2015; Revised 25 April 2015; Accepted 2 May 2015

Academic Editor: Stuart C. Mangel

Copyright © 2015 Daniela Mannarelli et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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