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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2015, Article ID 458123, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/458123
Research Article

Age-Related Alterations in the Expression of Genes and Synaptic Plasticity Associated with Nitric Oxide Signaling in the Mouse Dorsal Striatum

Department of Molecular Neurophysiology, Medical Faculty, Heinrich Heine University, 40225 Düsseldorf, Germany

Received 8 November 2014; Revised 9 February 2015; Accepted 10 February 2015

Academic Editor: Małgorzata Kossut

Copyright © 2015 Aisa N. Chepkova et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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