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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 475382, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/475382
Research Article

Altered Intra- and Interregional Synchronization in Resting-State Cerebral Networks Associated with Chronic Tinnitus

1Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Molecular and Functional Imaging, Department of Radiology, Zhongda Hospital, Medical School, Southeast University, Nanjing 210009, China
2Center for Hearing and Deafness, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY 14214, USA
3Department of Physiology, Southeast University, Nanjing 210009, China
4Medical School, Southeast University, Nanjing 210009, China
5Center for Functional Neuroimaging, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA
6Department of Otolaryngology, Zhongda Hospital, Medical School, Southeast University, Nanjing 210009, China
7School of Human Communication Disorders, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada B3J 1Y6

Received 22 October 2014; Accepted 20 December 2014

Academic Editor: Aage R. Møller

Copyright © 2015 Yu-Chen Chen et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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