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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2015, Article ID 581976, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/581976
Review Article

Clinical and Biochemical Manifestations of Depression: Relation to the Neurobiology of Stress

1National Institute of Mental Health Intramural Research Program, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
2Unit on Molecular Hormone Action, Program in Reproductive and Adult Endocrinology, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA

Received 8 September 2014; Accepted 8 January 2015

Academic Editor: Ana C. Andreazza

Copyright © 2015 Phillip W. Gold et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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