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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2015, Article ID 646595, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/646595
Research Article

The MMP-1/PAR-1 Axis Enhances Proliferation and Neuronal Differentiation of Adult Hippocampal Neural Progenitor Cells

1Laboratory of Neuroplasticity, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Piemonte Orientale “Amedeo Avogadro”, 28100 Novara, Italy
2Department of Neuroscience, Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, DC 20057, USA

Received 19 June 2015; Revised 13 August 2015; Accepted 6 September 2015

Academic Editor: Fabienne Agasse

Copyright © 2015 Maria Maddalena Valente et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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