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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 704849, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/704849
Research Article

Intensity Sensitive Modulation Effect of Theta Burst Form of Median Nerve Stimulation on the Monosynaptic Spinal Reflex

1Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Taoyuan City 333, Taiwan
2Department of Neurology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan City 333, Taiwan
3Neuroscience Research Center, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan City 333, Taiwan

Received 6 January 2015; Accepted 22 February 2015

Academic Editor: Aage R. Møller

Copyright © 2015 Kuei-Lin Yeh et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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