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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2015, Article ID 717312, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/717312
Research Article

Effects of Physical Exercise on Individual Resting State EEG Alpha Peak Frequency

1Institute of Movement and Neurosciences, German Sport University Cologne, 50933 Cologne, Germany
2Institute for Cardiology and Sports Medicine, German Sport University Cologne, 50933 Cologne, Germany

Received 17 September 2014; Accepted 21 December 2014

Academic Editor: Rajnish Chaturvedi

Copyright © 2015 Boris Gutmann et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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