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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 825157, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/825157
Research Article

Limited Effects of an eIF2αS51A Allele on Neurological Impairments in the 5xFAD Mouse Model of Alzheimer’s Disease

1German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE), Ludwig Erhard Allee 2, 53175 Bonn, Germany
2Federal Institute for Drugs and Medical Devices (BfArM), Kurt Georg Kiesinger Allee 3, 53175 Bonn, Germany
3Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University of Cologne, Kerpener Straße 62, 50937 Köln, Germany
4Institute of Molecular Psychiatry, University of Bonn, Sigmund Freud Straße 25, 53125 Bonn, Germany
5German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE), Fetscherstraße 105, 01307 Dresden, Germany

Received 17 December 2014; Revised 15 February 2015; Accepted 23 February 2015

Academic Editor: Clive R. Bramham

Copyright © 2015 Katharina Paesler et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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